General Knowledge Quiz #19

  1. Which country has the shortest coastline?
  2. What Italian term describes the mood of a piece of music as sweet?
  3. What famous saying, representing a deranged and directionless group of people, has been interpreted in creative works by Hieronymus Bosch, Katherine Anne Porter, Erasure, The Grateful Dead, and Bob Seger, among others?
  4. Kim Campbell was the first woman prime minister of which country?
  5. What is the French meaning of 'Marmite'?
  6. In architecture, cartouche is a decorative feature resembling what?
  7. According to his memoirs, what famous Venetian adventurer was once imprisoned as a magician, a director of the Paris state lotteries, knighted in the Netherlands, a spy for Louis XV, and a librarian in Bohemia?
  8. What is the name of the street in London famous for its tailors shops?
  9. Who was the 'father of medicine' to whom a code of medical ethics is attributed and which bears his name?
  10. What shape is farfalle pasta?
  11. Pb is the symbol for which chemical element?
  12. What city did Charles II of England sell to France in 1662 for £40,000?
  13. From which creatures can Newcastle disease transfer to humans, causing mild conjunctivitis and flu symptoms?
  14. What household gadget did Melville R Bissell invent 1876?
  15. British Landrace, Pietrain and Tamworth are what sort of animals?
  16. Lee Kuan Yew became the first officially elected prime minister of which country in 1959?
  17. Who was rumoured to to have had his first wife Amy Robsart poisoned, in the hope of marrying Queen Elizabeth the First?
  18. A Salchow (usually pronounced 'salco' or 'salcov') is a jump in which sport?
  19. What is the capital of Barbados?
  20. Of Albanian descent, by what name is 1979 Nobel Prizewinner Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu better known?
  21. Mjosa (more precisely Mjøsa) is the largest lake of which country?
  22. How would 'good day' normally be said in Japanese?
  23. What is the highest volcano in Africa?
  24. The German Deutschmark was comprised of one hundred what?
  25. 'Atoms for Peace', formed in 1957, is now known as what?
  26. The traditional biathlon most commonly (for example at the Olympics) consists of which two sports?
  27. The word deltiologist, derived from the Greek 'deltos' meaning writing-tablet, refers to a collector of what?
  28. Who wrote in 1770 "If God did not exist it would be necessary to invent him"?
  29. What year did the Channel Tunnel between Britain and France open?
  30. Which tragic figure of Greek mythology became the King of Thebes after solving the Sphinx's riddle to guess what walks on four legs in the morning, two in the afternoon and three in the evening?

General Knowledge Quiz #19 Answers

  1. Which country has the shortest coastline? Monaco (3.5 miles)
  2. What Italian term describes the mood of a piece of music as sweet? Dolce (pronounced dolchay)
  3. What famous saying, representing a deranged and directionless group of people, has been interpreted in creative works by Hieronymus Bosch, Katherine Anne Porter, Erasure, The Grateful Dead, and Bob Seger, among others? Ship of Fools
  4. Kim Campbell was the first woman prime minister of which country? Canada (She served from 25 June to 4 November 1993, succeeding Brian Mulroney.)
  5. What is the French meaning of 'Marmite'? Cooking pot (or stew pan - there is a picture of one on the Marmite label.)
  6. In architecture, cartouche is a decorative feature resembling what? A scroll
  7. According to his memoirs, what famous Venetian adventurer was once imprisoned as a magician, a director of the Paris state lotteries, knighted in the Netherlands, a spy for Louis XV, and a librarian in Bohemia? Casanova (fully, Giacomo Girolamo Casanova de Seingalt, 1725-98)
  8. What is the name of the street in London famous for its tailors shops? Savile Row
  9. Who was the 'father of medicine' to whom a code of medical ethics is attributed and which bears his name? Hippocrates (Hippocrates, c.460-370BC, is regarded first to have defined the principles of the Hippocratic Oath, hence its name.)
  10. What shape is farfalle pasta? Bow tie (or butterfly, which is what farfalle means in Italian.)
  11. Pb is the symbol for which chemical element? Lead (derived from the Latin 'plumbum', from which the word plumber also derives - because the first plumbers used lead for pipes, etc.)
  12. What city did Charles II of England sell to France in 1662 for £40,000? Dunkirk
  13. From which creatures can Newcastle disease transfer to humans, causing mild conjunctivitis and flu symptoms? Birds (especially poultry - apparently first discovered in the East Indies in 1926 it was identified later in Newcastle-upon-Tyne a year later, hence the name.)
  14. What household gadget did Melville R Bissell invent 1876? Carpet sweeper
  15. British Landrace, Pietrain and Tamworth are what sort of animals? Pigs (they are all domesticated pig breeds)
  16. Lee Kuan Yew became the first officially elected prime minister of which country in 1959? Singapore (The Republic of Singapore, from the Malay words singa - lion, and pura - city. Singapore became independent of Malaysia in 1965, prior to which it was a British colony until 1959. Singapore is about twenty-five times more densely populated than the UK, and in fact only Monaco is more crowded of all the countries of the world.)
  17. Who was rumoured to to have had his first wife Amy Robsart poisoned, in the hope of marrying Queen Elizabeth the First? Robert Dudley, Earl of Leicester
  18. A Salchow (usually pronounced 'salco' or 'salcov') is a jump in which sport? Figure skating (after Swedish skater Ulrich Salchow, its inventor and the first to perform the jump in major competition, in 1909. The jump involves a full revolution in the air, normally taking off and landing on different feet, and can be extended to more than one revolution, hence 'triple salchow', which obviously is three. No-one has managed anything more than a quadruple Salchow. )
  19. What is the capital of Barbados? Bridgetown
  20. Of Albanian descent, by what name is 1979 Nobel Prizewinner Agnes Gonxha Bojaxhiu better known? Mother Teresa
  21. Mjosa (more precisely Mjøsa) is the largest lake of which country? Norway (can anyone please clarify the pronunciation of Mjøsa?)
  22. How would 'good day' normally be said in Japanese? Konnichi wa (or similar, for example ko-nee-chee-wa)
  23. What is the highest volcano in Africa? Kilimanjaro (aka Kilima Njaro, Kilima Dscharo, and Oldoinyo Oibor. Kilimanjaro is also Africa's highest mountain, almost 20,000 feet high, with an estimated total volume of 1,150 cubic miles. In modern times Kilimanjaro emits little more than steam and sulphur. Kilimanjaro is in Tanzania on the Kenyan border, close to Mombassa and Nairobi in Kenya, and to Lake Victoria, and is one of about 20 volcanoes in the East African Rift Valley.)
  24. The German Deutschmark was comprised of one hundred what? Pfennig
  25. 'Atoms for Peace', formed in 1957, is now known as what? The International Atomic Energy Agency (The IAEA, based in Vienna, is an independent and specialised agency of the United Nations, and seeks to promote peaceful and safe use of nuclear energy.)
  26. The traditional biathlon most commonly (for example at the Olympics) consists of which two sports? Skiing and shooting (Cross-country skiing and rifle-shooting to be exact - in that order. There are other two-sport events called biathlons, but skiing and shooting is the original and usual recognized pairing where the term is used in a world championship or Olympic context.)
  27. The word deltiologist, derived from the Greek 'deltos' meaning writing-tablet, refers to a collector of what? Postcards (picture postcards more precisely)
  28. Who wrote in 1770 "If God did not exist it would be necessary to invent him"? Voltaire(or real name Francois Marie Arouet, 1694-1778, French writer, philosopher and historian. The quote is from his epistle: Letter to the Author of The Three Impostors, or in French, Épître à l'Auteur du Livre des Trois Imposteurs, dated 10 November 1770.)
  29. What year did the Channel Tunnel between Britain and France open? 1994 (The official opening was 6 May 1994, in Calais, performed by Queen Elizabeth II and President Francois Mitterrand. Interestingly, the French chose to retrieve their huge tunnel boring machine, while the British chose to leave theirs in the tunnel, buried in concrete.)
  30. Which tragic figure of Greek mythology became the King of Thebes after solving the Sphinx's riddle to guess what walks on four legs in the morning, two in the afternoon and three in the evening? Oedipus (The answer to the riddle was 'Man', who in life first crawls, then walks, and finally walks with a stick. The psychoanalyst Freud's choice of the term 'Oedipus Complex' to describe a male's infatuation with his mother is based on the story of Oedipus, in which the King casts his baby son and heir Oedipus out of the city to die, so as to avert a prophecy that Oedipus will one day kill his father to become King and also take the Queen as his wife, which does indeed happen. There is a more to the story, and I'll not spoil the ending.)


Last modified: Wednesday, 12 December 2018, 3:24 PM