General Knowledge Quiz #20

  1. Aconcagua is the highest peak in which mountain range?
  2. What of these sports bodies was founded first, the AAA, FA, MCC or IOC?
  3. Who was president of the USSR from 1982-84?
  4. What was American silent film star 'Fatty' Arbuckle's first name?
  5. The character Roger 'Race' Bannon appeared as a boy's bodyguard in which cartoon series?
  6. Guru Nanak Dev founded which religion?
  7. The Phoenix Park murders of 1882 took place in which city?
  8. Who designed the famous Sagrada Familia church in Barcelona?
  9. Who was Henry VIII's third wife?
  10. From which seeds is tahini made?
  11. What is the human ailment epistaxis better known as?
  12. The Kariba Dam is on which river?
  13. What does the B stand for in Lyndon B Johnson?
  14. What item of attire is a leghorn?
  15. What does an oologist collect?
  16. The Neanderthal Museum is in which country?
  17. In which country is the European Court of Human Rights?
  18. In British history a Cavalier was a supporter of which king?
  19. Leporine relates to which animal?
  20. In Greek mythology who was Apollo's twin sister?
  21. Assassinated in 1965, who was Malcolm Little better known as?
  22. What was the name of Ernest Shackleton's ship which became stuck in Antarctic ice in 1915?
  23. By what name was Dutch dancer Margarethe Zelle better known?
  24. Which famous US lawman had brothers called Morgan and Virgil?
  25. What was the name of the cruise ship seized by hijackers in the Mediterranean in 1985?
  26. What type of creature is an amberjack?
  27. In 1968 which US artist and film maker was shot and wounded by actress Valerie Solanas?
  28. Quinsy is an inflammation of which part of the body?
  29. What is the capital of Croatia?
  30. What is the international distress signal one level below and less serious than a 'Mayday' call?
  31. Carambola is another name for which fruit?
  32. In 1902 the Treaty of Vereeniging brought which war to an end?
  33. Who was assassinated by Hugh de Merville, William de Tracy, Reginald Fitzhurse and Richard le Breton?
  34. The original 'Wendy house' was built for which fictional character?
  35. Convict Robert Franklin Stroud was better known as whom?
  36. What scientist and inventor was responsible for the Decibel unit of measurement?
  37. Which city is known as Auld Reekie and also Athens of the North?
  38. The French slang 'capote anglaise' meaning English hood, or English overcoat refers to what?
  39. Maris Piper is a variety of which vegetable?
  40. An epithalamium is a song or poem celebrating what?
  41. Which is the lightest element?
  42. Dame Peggy Ashcroft won an Oscar for her role in which 1984 film?
  43. In 1865 what significant event happened at Ford's Theatre in Washington DC?
  44. Who painted The Blue Boy in 1779?
  45. Who wrote the poem Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard?
  46. Little Big Horn, the scene of Custer's last stand, is in which US state?
  47. Which year was the death penalty for murder abolished in Britain?
  48. What clash, in 1746, was the last major battle to be fought on mainland Britain?
  49. Who was Britain's first Labour prime minister?
  50. What does UNESCO stand for?

General Knowledge Quiz #20 Answers

  1. Aconcagua is the highest peak in which mountain range? Andes (Aconcagua is 22,834 feet high, and is in Argentina)
  2. What of these sports bodies was founded first, the AAA, FA, MCC or IOC? MCC(Marylebone Cricket Club, formed in 1787, is the governing body of world cricket. The Football Association was formed in 1863, Amateur Athletics Association in 1880, and the International Olympic Committee in 1894)
  3. Who was president of the USSR from 1982-84? Yuri Andropov (1914-84, he died in office from various problems related to kidney failure. Andropov was preceded by Leonid Brezhnev and succeeded by Konstantin Chernenko, and can be credited for grooming the reforming Mikhail Gorbachev for leadership)
  4. What was American silent film star 'Fatty' Arbuckle's first name? Roscoe
  5. The character Roger 'Race' Bannon appeared as a boy's bodyguard in which cartoon series? Jonny Quest (the Hanna-Barbera action-adventure animation made from 1964-65 was one of the earliest targets for criticism about scenes of violence in children's TV programmes. Bonus points for knowing the name of Jonny's dog: Bandit)
  6. Guru Nanak Dev founded which religion? Sikhism (the basis of the Sikh religion was established in the late 1400's by Guru Nanak, 1469-1539, formalised later in what became known as the Adi Granth, defining the three pillars of Sikhism; namely daily meditation and chanting, working productively and honestly, and sharing and giving)
  7. The Phoenix Park murders of 1882 took place in which city? Dublin (Lord Frederick Cavendish and Thomas Henry Burke, the second and third most senior ministers in the British government of Ireland were victims of the Irish Invincibles, an Irish nationalist group)
  8. Who designed the famous Sagrada Familia church in Barcelona? Gaudi (Antoni Gaudi i Cornet, 1852-1926 - work on Sagrada Familia started in 1884 and amazingly it is still being built)
  9. Who was Henry VIII's third wife? Jane Seymour (1509-37, married 1536-7, mother of future Edward VI, but died 12 days after the birth - no doubt before Henry had a chance to find something wrong with her and have her executed..)
  10. From which seeds is tahini made? Sesame (tahini is a paste used especially in Middle Eastern and Oriental savoury cuisine)
  11. What is the human ailment epistaxis better known as? Nosebleed
  12. The Kariba Dam is on which river? Zambezi (or Zambesi - it starts in Zambia and eventually reaches the Indian Ocean in Mozambique, passing over Victoria Falls along the way. The dam lies between Zambia and Zimbabwe who share its electrical output. Apparently four of the 87 men who died building it remain buried in the concrete)
  13. What does the B stand for in Lyndon B Johnson? Baines (Lyndon B Johnson, 1908-73, also known as LBJ, 36th president of the USA, succeeded John F Kennedy in 1963, and held office until retirement in January 1969)
  14. What item of attire is a leghorn? Hat (made of straw)
  15. What does an oologist collect? Birds' eggs
  16. The Neanderthal Museum is in which country? Germany (near Mettmann, in Western Germany between Dusseldorf and Wuppertal)
  17. In which country is the European Court of Human Rights? France (in Strasbourg - the European Court of Human Rights has jurisdiction over the contracting nations of the Council of Europe, founded in 1949 to develop European democratic principles based on the European Convention on Human Rights. As at June 2007 there are 47 contracting nations)
  18. In British history a Cavalier was a supporter of which king? Charles I (the royalist 'Cavaliers' fought the 'Roundheads' in the English Civil War 1642-51. The name Cavalier referred to the arrogant fashion and attitude associated with cavalry officers. Roundhead referred to the pudding-bowl hairstyles favoured by the anti-royalists which contrasted with the flamboyant long curls of their opponents. Just like the mods and the rockers..)
  19. Leporine relates to which animal? Hare
  20. In Greek mythology who was Apollo's twin sister? Artemis (Goddess of the Hunt and Wild, sometimes extending to the Moon too, daughter of Zeus, handy with a bow and arrow, and generally not the type of girl to mess around)
  21. Assassinated in 1965, who was Malcolm Little better known as? Malcolm X (1925-65, American black nationalist leader, also known by his adopted Muslim name el-Hajj Malik el-Shabazz)
  22. What was the name of Ernest Shackleton's ship which became stuck in Antarctic ice in 1915? HMS Endurance
  23. By what name was Dutch dancer Margarethe Zelle better known? Mata Hari (1876-1917, famous for her relationships with powerful men on both sides of the First World War, ending with her execution by the French, accused of spying for Germany, although doubts remain as to the reliability of the evidence and the conviction - her stage name Mata Hari is Indonesian for sun - literally 'eye of the day')
  24. Which famous US lawman had brothers called Morgan and Virgil? Wyatt Earp (famed for his involvement in the 1881 Gunfight at the OK Corral, Tombstone, Arizona, when the Earps and Doc Holliday fought the Clantons and McLaurys)
  25. What was the name of the cruise ship seized by hijackers in the Mediterranean in 1985? Achille Lauro
  26. What type of creature is an amberjack? Fish (found and fished in warm coastal waters around the world)
  27. In 1968 which US artist and film maker was shot and wounded by actress Valerie Solanas? Andy Warhol
  28. Quinsy is an inflammation of which part of the body? Throat
  29. What is the capital of Croatia? Zagreb (whoch loosely means grab, and possible relates grabbing or taking water)
  30. What is the international distress signal one level below and less serious than a 'Mayday' call? Pan-pan (usually three times, and pronounced 'pawn-pawn' - the Morse code equivalent is TTT. The term is from the French word panne meaning breakdown. Incidentally Mayday - Morse equivalent SOS - is from French m'aider meaning help me,more fully explained in the expressions origins section. The French word sécurité - again usually announced three times - is the third level of emergency, typically used for maritime navigational or weather warnings)
  31. Carambola is another name for which fruit? Star fruit (also known as a kamranga or coromandel gooseberry)
  32. In 1902 the Treaty of Vereeniging brought which war to an end? The Second Boer War(there were two Boer Wars - the First Boer War was 1880–1881; the Second Boer War was 1899–1902)
  33. Who was assassinated by Hugh de Merville, William de Tracy, Reginald Fitzhurse and Richard le Breton? Thomas Becket (also referred to as Thomas à Becket, Archbishop of Canterbury, 1118-70, murdered during the reign of Henry II, who later confessed to having incited the murder, asking to be rid of 'this turbulent priest'. Becket was canonized - St Thomas Becket - in 1173)
  34. The original 'Wendy house' was built for which fictional character? Wendy Darling (in the play and novel Peter Pan, written by J M Barrie in 1904)
  35. Convict Robert Franklin Stroud was better known as whom? The Birdman of Alcatraz(1890-1963, imprisoned for manslaughter in 1909, he killed a prison guard in 1916 and spent the rest of his life in prison, achieving fame for breeding and writing about canaries)
  36. What scientist and inventor was responsible for the Decibel unit of measurement? Alexander Graham Bell (1847-1922, inventor of the telephone in 1876 - incidentally, a decibel is one tenth of a bel)
  37. Which city is known as Auld Reekie and also Athens of the North? Edinburgh
  38. The French slang 'capote anglaise' meaning English hood, or English overcoat refers to what? A condom
  39. Maris Piper is a variety of which vegetable? Potato
  40. An epithalamium is a song or poem celebrating what? Marriage (or a wedding)
  41. Which is the lightest element? Hydrogen
  42. Dame Peggy Ashcroft won an Oscar for her role in which 1984 film? A Passage to India
  43. In 1865 what significant event happened at Ford's Theatre in Washington DC? Abraham Lincoln's assassination (by John Wilkes Booth, who interestingly was at the time a successful actor, although not performing in the play Lincoln was watching, which was called Our American Cousin)
  44. Who painted The Blue Boy in 1779? Thomas Gainsborough
  45. Who wrote the poem Elegy Written in a Country Churchyard? Thomas Gray (1716-71, the 1751 poem features some of the most commonly quoted lines among all poerty, and originated some very famous expressions including 'far from the madding crowd', 'celestial fire' and 'kindred spirit')
  46. Little Big Horn, the scene of Custer's last stand, is in which US state? Montana (25-26 June 1876)
  47. Which year was the death penalty for murder abolished in Britain? 1965
  48. What clash, in 1746, was the last major battle to be fought on mainland Britain? The Battle of Culloden (fought near Inverness in the Scottish Highlands, Culloden ended the Scottish Jacobite rising and preserved the British throne from the incumbent Hanoverian King George II)
  49. Who was Britain's first Labour prime minister? Ramsey MacDonald (1866-1937, first term Jan-Nov 1924, followed by terms from 1929-31, and 1931-35 in charge of a new 'national' government in response to the 1931 financial crisis)
  50. What does UNESCO stand for? United Nations Educational Scientific and Cultural Organization


Last modified: Wednesday, 10 October 2018, 2:32 PM